Routine Allergic Conjunctivitis Medications

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  • Alcaftadine (Lastacaft) 0.25% - H1 antihistamine, 1 drop each eye QD for age >2 years old

Ophthalmic Corticosteroids

  • In ophthalmology, no steroid is considered “safe", therefore patients given ocular steroids should be monitored by an ophthalmologist due to risk of increased intraocular pressure, infection, and cataracts
  • Preferable to use agents with low absorption through ocular surface
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  • Loteprednol etabonate 0.2% (Alrex) - One drop into affected eyes QID
    • Indicated for the temporary relief of the signs and symptoms of seasonal allergic conjunctivitis
    • Adverse reactions include elevated intraocular pressure (1-2% of those treated for 28 days), which may be associated with optic nerve damage, posterior subcapsular cataracts, exacerbation of ocular viral and fungal infections


Notes Regarding Administration

  • Allow at least 5 minutes between instillation of different eye medications to decrease washout
  • Closing eyelids after drug instillation helps increase absorption into ocular tissues


References